Virtual OAG


OAG Curatorial Chat: Brendan Fernandes and Catherine Sinclair
September 3, 2020

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Brendan Fernandes’ practice was discussed in this chat, which blends dance and visual arts to explore issues of race, queer culture, migration, protest and other forms of collective movement, the conversation also explored Fernandes’ work Clean Labour (2017), currently on view in 리듬풍경​ RhythmScape at the OAG until January 3rd, 2021.

Originally shown in South Korea and then in Japan, the North American debut of international exhibition 리듬풍경 RhythmScape features a variety of contemporary artistic strategies that measure the pulse of life, society and work. For the Ottawa Art Gallery’s edition, Canadian artists Brendan Fernandes, Tiphaine Girault and Paula Bath join the work of Korean artists Yong Ju Kwon, Hwayeon Nam, Jung Uk Yang, Sojung Jun, and duo Hyejeong Cho and Sook Hyun Kim, as well as the work of Japanese artist Tetsuya Umeda and Swedish artist Johanna Billing. Together their work brings forth a better understanding of human interaction through life and labour.

리듬풍경​ RhythmScape is organized and circulated by The Gyeonggi Museum of Modern Art, South Korea. The exhibition is presented in partnership with the Embassy of the Republic of South Korea to Canada, the Korean Cultural Centre Canada, through the support of the Korean Foundation for International Culture Exchange.

          

Sponsored by: 


OAG’s In Conversation’s are made possible with the support of BMO.


Brendan Fernandes (b. 1979, Nairobi, Kenya) is an internationally recognized Canadian artist working at the intersection of dance and visual arts. Currently based out of Chicago, Brendan’s projects address issues of race, queer culture, migration, protest and other forms of collective movement. Always looking to create new spaces and new forms of agency, Brendan’s projects take on hybrid forms: part Ballet, part queer dance hall, part political protest...always rooted in collaboration and fostering solidarity. Brendan is a graduate of the Whitney Independent Study Program (2007) and a recipient of a Robert Rauschenberg Fellowship (2014). In 2010, he was shortlisted for the Sobey Art Award, and is the recipient of a prestigious 2017 Canada Council New Chapters grant. Brendan is also the recipient of the Artadia Award (2019), a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship (2020) and a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation grant (2019). His projects have shown at the 2019 Whitney Biennial (New York); the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (New York); the Museum of Modern Art (New York); The Getty Museum (Los Angeles); the National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa); MAC (Montreal); among a great many others. He is currently artist-in-residency and faculty at Northwestern University and represented by Monique Meloche Gallery in Chicago. Recent and upcoming projects include performances and solo presentations at the Noguchi Museum (New York); Monique Meloche Gallery (Chicago); the Art Gallery of Ontario (Toronto); and the Museo De Arte São Paulo (São Paulo).

Photo: Kevin Penczak


Catherine Sinclair is Deputy Director, Chief Curator at the Ottawa Art Gallery (OAG) and curated the inclusion of Canadian artists in the North American debut of the international exhibition RhythmScape (2020), originating from the Geyongi Museum of Modern Art (GMoMA). At the OAG since 2006, she has curated over forty exhibitions, including most recently Russell Yuristy: The inside of elephants and all kinds of things (2020), Michèle Provost: everything must go / liquidation totale (2018), We’ll all become stories: A Survey of Art in the Ottawa-Gatineau Region (2018, co-curated), and The Arts Students League of New York and its Influence in Canada (forthcoming 2021). She has presented at the University Art Association Conference (UAAC) and the Canadian Women Artists History Initiative Conference (CWAHI), and published in The Journal of Curatorial Studies (2018, co-author) and esse arts + opinions (2019). She was a recipient of the AAMC Foundation Engagement Program for International Curators (2017-2019).


Photo: André Rozon

 


Learn more about Jennifer Dickson's artworks
August 27, 2020

We invite you to discover an artwork from Jennifer Dickson’s exhibition The Credo Project and virtually travel to the architectural space that inspired it! Exploring sacred spaces of the three Abrahamic religions and examining how these buildings bear the passage of time, the images in The Credo Project were captured during Dickson’s travels to the U.K., Cyprus, Portugal, Spain, Turkey and Morocco between 1979 and 2008. Here we take a closer look at Sultan’s Loge in the Selimiye Mosque depicted in Credo: Ten. The Credo Project is currently on view at the OAG until February 7, 2021.

Take a moment to observe the profusion of ornate detail at the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne, Turkey. Designed by the architect Mimar Sinan for Sultan Selim II and built between 1569 and 1575, the space was made sumptuous to impress visitors to the Ottoman Empire. Following the Islamic tradition, which forbids images of Muhammad, the richly decorative interior features calligraphy, as well as Iznik tile motifs such as saz leaves, fruit trees in blossom, and tulips, which represent Allah. This decorative program adorns the symmetrical interior of this sacred space that is still used as a place of worship today. Click here to further explore the interior of the mosque on Google Earth or take a 360 tour of the building, here.

Credo: Ten (Sultan’s Loge, Selimiye Mosque, Edirne, Turkey), 1999–2011, archival inkjet print. © Jennifer Dickson. Copyright Visual Arts – CARCC, 2020.

 



Learn more about Jennifer Dickson's artworks
August 20, 2020

We invite you to discover an artwork from Jennifer Dickson’s exhibition The Credo Project and virtually travel to the architectural space that inspired it! Exploring sacred spaces of the three Abrahamic religions and examining how these buildings bear the passage of time, the images in The Credo Project were captured during Dickson’s travels to the U.K., Cyprus, Portugal, Spain, Turkey and Morocco between 1979 and 2008. Here, we take a closer look at Fountains Abbey depicted in Credo: One. The Credo Project is currently on view at the OAG until February 7, 2021.

Once the wealthiest Cistercian monastery in England, Fountains Abbey in Ripon has fallen into ruin since the abolition of the monasteries under Henry VIII. First founded in 1132, the abbey’s buildings were expanded over its 407 years in operation. With formidable vaulting and soaring pointed arches, the architecture of the abbey represents an exquisite example of the Medieval Gothic period. After dissolution, the site came under private ownership, and the ruins were integrated into the Studley Royal water gardens, the loveliest of the 18th century English picturesque gardens. Click here to walk among the ruins, or further explore the site in this 3D tour

Credo: One (Fountains Abbey, England), 1979–2011, archival inkjet print. © Jennifer Dickson. Copyright Visual Arts – CARCC, 2020.
 


Learn more about Jennifer Dickson's artworks
July 30, 2020


We invite you to discover an artwork from Jennifer Dickson’s exhibition The Credo Project and virtually travel to the architectural space that inspired it! Exploring sacred spaces of the three Abrahamic religions and examining how these buildings bear the passage of time, the images in The Credo Project were captured during Dickson’s travels to the U.K., Cyprus, Portugal, Spain, Turkey and Morocco between 1979 and 2008. Here, we take a closer look at the Synagogue of Cordoba depicted in Credo: Four. The Credo Project is currently on view at the OAG until February 7, 2021.

Did you know that in Medieval Spain there was peaceful co- existence and cultural exchange between Jewish, Christian and Muslim communities prior to later forced conversions and persecutions? This climate is reflected in Jennifer Dickson’s photographs of the Synagogue of Cordoba, built in Cordoba’s Jewish Quarter in 1315 by Muslim craftsmen. On the interior, the Mudéjar tradition (which refers to the application of ornamentation and decorative elements that stems from Islamic art) appears in the multi-foiled arch and stuccoed plant motifs, which stand alongside lines of Hebrew script. Click here to explore a 360 view of the prayer hall captured in Dickson’s photograph, and explore more of the building on Google Earth here

Jennifer Dickson, Credo: Four (Synagogue, Cordoba, Spain), 2003–2011, archival inkjet print. © Jennifer Dickson. Copyright Visual Arts – CARCC, 2020.
 


One Year Later: An Artist Talk with Tiffany April
July 20, 2020

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Following her University of Ottawa MFA thesis exhibition, The Surgeon and the Magician, at the OAG in 2019, Tiffany April returns (virtually!) to speak about her artistic practice, her work, and what she’s up to now. These annual talks are part of a series that bring artists from the OAG’s MFA Exhibition and Mentorship Program back to the gallery one year after their graduate exhibition to spotlight their practice and explore their development. Please note this program will take place in English. La présentation déroulera en anglais

The OAG MFA Exhibition and Mentorship Program is made possible with the support of the RBC Emerging Artists Project and in partnership with the University of Ottawa, Department of Visual Arts.

Tiffany April is a visual artist born in Montreal and currently living and working in her Ottawa based studio. April’s work includes paintings and installations involving projection and reflectivity. Her practice has evolved through her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Arts at Concordia University (2014), and the completion of her MFA at the University of Ottawa (2019). April also attended TAKT residency in Berlin, Germany (2015), and has exhibited in Berlin and South Korea. Her work is internationally collected and in 2018 joined the City of Ottawa’s art collection.

   


In Conversation with Claudia Gutierrez and Tafui
July 20, 2020

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On March 13, 2020, the OAG closed its doors in response to the COVID-19 global pandemic—just two days after of the opening of five new exhibits including the Galerie Annexe (OAG’s commercial gallery) show ‘TETHERS │SCARS’ featuring regional artists Claudia Gutierrez and Tafui.

Here is an intimate conversation with both multidisciplinary artists, exploring their reactions to, and practice during, the pandemic, with Maxine Patenaude, host/lead organizer of OAG partner CreativeMornings Ottawa.


Another Field Trip
July 9, 2020


OAG continues its exciting partnership with FIELD TRIP by sharing a short documentary (6:27) of local artist Russell Yuristy, whose work is featured in the exhibition Russell Yuristy: The Inside of Elephants and All Kinds of Things, currently installed at the OAG.

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From a refurbished church-turned-studio in the 1970s, Yuristy embraced the subconscious, absurd and everyday experiences in a series of fantastical drawings and ceramics. Through these creations, Yuristy contributed to the development of Regina Funk Art, a pop art movement in which artists used humour and mixed materials to create anti-consumer commentary. During this time, he also founded the “Creative Playground Workshop,” through which he created public commissions: large wooden animal sculptures that doubled as play structures for children. These animal sculptures foreshadowed his move into wildlife-based drawings, prints and paintings in later years, following his relocation to Ottawa in 1985. Drawing on a practical respect for nature’s cycles of life-and-death as experienced on the farm, his works position his creatures as mirrors for the frailty and absurdity of the human experience.

ABOUT THE ARTIST.

Russell Yuristy was born in Goodeve, Saskatchewan in 1936. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Saskatchewan, (Saskatoon) (1959) and earned a Masters of Science (Art) from the University of Wisconsin, Madison (1967). He joined the Visual Arts Faculty of the University of Saskatchewan (Regina) that year where he taught until 1971 and coordinated three Emma Lake Artists’ Workshops. He has been awarded grants from the Saskatchewan Arts Board and the Canada Council for the Arts. He was the subject of a feature article in Artscanada (now Canadian Art) magazine in 1972 and a National Film Board documentary in 1978. His works have been included in solo and group exhibitions throughout his career, including Canada Trajectoires ’73 (Musée d’art moderne de la Ville de Paris), Regina Clay: Worlds in the Making (Mackenzie Art Gallery, 2006), and Russell Yuristy: … a kind of abandon (Moose Jaw Museum and Art Gallery, 2010). He has received numerous major public commissions including from Expo Canada, the City of Ottawa and the CBC. His works can be found in public and private collections including the National Gallery of Canada, Canada Council Art Bank, Remai Modern (formerly the Mendel Art Gallery), Ottawa Art Gallery, Carleton University Art Gallery, Mackenzie Art Gallery, McDonald Corporation (Chicago) and Shaklee Corporation (San Francisco). He has taught printmaking at the Ottawa School of Art, and continues to live and practise in Ottawa.

Russell Yuristy, produced by the Ottawa Art Gallery, 2020, 6 min 27 sec, producer: Taline Jirian; filmographer: Chris Snow
 


Canada Life OAG Art Tent Activity At Home
July 3, 2020


Inspired by Russell Yuristy’s current exhibition at the OAG, this short instructional video demonstrates how to make your own paper animal puppets. This fun activity is like one you would find at the Canada Life OAG Art Tent, which typically travels to community events and festivals in the Ottawa area each summer. Until we are back in your community, this is something you can also do at home.

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Sponsored by Canada Life


The Ottawa Art Gallery is proud to present its first exhibition to tour abroad!
June 18, 2020

Wrapped in Culture, a collaborative, Indigenous-led and community-grounded project, organized by lead-artist Rosalie Favell, will stop in three Canadian galleries and will make two stops in Australia in 2021.

Virtual Tour
*Scroll down to bottom to access. 

In 2017, the project brought ten Indigenous artists from across Canada and Southeastern Australia to Ottawa, where they created contemporary works based on a North American Indigenous Plains-style buffalo robe and an Australian Aboriginal possum-skin cloak. This work sought to bridge together people from Indigenous and non-Indigenous backgrounds to foster creativity, exchange cultural knowledge and share life experiences. For the exhibition tour, we aimed to bring the exhibition to each artist's home territories and to present it to several different Indigenous communities. The participating artists represent several diverse nations which include: in Canada, the Anishnaabe (Odawa), Cree, Métis, and Siksika (Blackfoot); and in Australia, the Barkindji, Boon-Wurrung, Mutti Mutti, Yorta Yorta, and trawlwoolway.

In April 2019, the exhibition opened at the OAG in Ottawa, the current home of Barry Ace, Meryl McMaster, and Rosalie Favell. This past winter, it traveled out to the Prairies at Wanuskewin Heritage Centre in Saskatoon, closer to Adrian Stimson's home in Alberta. Later on this year, it will head to the Art Gallery of Algoma in Sault-Ste-Marie, ON. In 2021, Wrapped in Culture will be off to the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery in Launceston, Tasmania, where Vicki West will welcome the exhibition to her home state. It will then travel to Footscray Community Arts Centre in Melbourne, home to Maree Clarke and Mitch Mahoney, and close to Kerri Clarke, Molly Mahoney, and Wade Mahoney in New South Wales. The final stop will be back in Canada, at the Thunder Bay Art Gallery at the end of 2021.

To learn more about the project, the artists, and to view a 3-D virtual tour of the exhibition's installation at OAG, please click here. Scroll down to bottom to access virtual tour. 

Wahsontiio Cross, Assistant Curator, Touring Indigenous Projects

This tour is made possible through the generous support of the Ontario Arts Council and from the Canada Council for the Arts.

Photo : Justin Wonnacott


OAG Curatorial Chats: Russell Yuristy


In this first video of the series, Catherine Sinclair, OAG's Deputy Director and Chief Curator shares her experiences of curating the exhibition Russell Yuristy: The Inside of Elephants and All Kinds of Things which opened this past February at OAG. | Photos: Justin Wonnacott, Chris Snow and John-Finnigan Lin 

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Webinar | Art In the Digital Age: Live with Ana Serrano

Alexandra Badzak, OAG’s Director and CEO explores the transformative challenges of the arts sector in the digital age, with guest: Ana Serrano, Chief Digital Officer of the Canadian Film Centre, and newly appointed President of OCAD U

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Field Trip: Art Across Canada

OAG is excited to partner with FIELD TRIP! Our inaugural post features Brendan Fernandes’ Clean Labor, part of the exhibition RhythmScape, which opened on March 12, just prior to the OAG’s temporary closure due to COVID19.

Field Trip: Art Across Canada is a new online platform to deliver arts experiences with some of Canada’s most celebrated artists in a national partnership with leading arts organizations. From children’s programs to artist talks and workshops, these activities are designed to advance the work of our nation’s organizations through digital platforms for different age groups, on a range of subjects, that engage communities and support artists, particularly during the challenges presented during a pandemic.

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Brendan Fernandes’ Clean Labor (2017) was a site-specific performance that drew attention to the invisible hands that prepare hotel rooms for guests and focused on the role of the body in such a physically demanding profession. During the performance, while the hotel room attendant went through their regular motions to clean the room, they were paired with a dancer who enacted complimentary gestures of physical exertion. Dancers were encouraged to improvise movements related to their own understanding of the experience. As most room attendants are immigrants to North America with undervalued skills, Brendan Fernandes drew them into the choreography of the movements. During the performance, dancers gently requested – indicated by a hand-on-shoulder – that the staff should pause in their work. These pauses created moments of reflection for the staff, dancers and audience to understand the meticulous actions necessary to achieve a clean, safe and liveable space.

RhythmScape is presented in partnership with the Embassy of the Republic of South Korea to Canada, the Korean Cultural Centre Canada, through the support of the Korean Foundation for International Culture Exchange.

Film-still credit: Brendan Fernandes (Canadian, born 1979, based in Chicago, Illinois), Clean Labor, 2017, film and photographic documentation of performance at the Wythe Hotel, Brooklyn, NY, March 5, 2017, courtesy of the artist.


(Re)Mapping Place

OAG wants to be a part of your homeschooling experience. This 5-minute video will walk you through the steps of an art activity called (re)Mapping Place, developed by Ottawa-based artist Barry Ace (Anishinaabe).
 
Share your creations with us on social media!  #OAGfromhome

Additional resources from our book Contemporary Indigenous Arts in the Classroom can be found below.
Please share your creations with us on social media! #OAGfromhome

PDF version of Contemporary Indigenous Arts in the Classroom

Lesson plans by grade



OAG 3D Virtual Tour: Firestone Gallery

We look forward to welcoming you through our doors again. Until then, you’re invited on a virtual 3D tour of the OAG’s Firestone Gallery. This tour takes you back to the inauguration of the new OAG in 2018.

Thank you to Point3D Commercial Imaging for their generous support of this project! The tour is available to view in virtual reality! Click on the "View in VR" icon on the bottom right to connect your VR device. 


Chronology of Art in the Ottawa / Gatineau Region

​Click on the image above to explore an interactive timeline of art in the Ottawa / Gatineau region from prehistory to present day. This timeline was created for OAG's inaugural exhibition Àdisòkàmagan / Nous connaître un peu nous-mêmes / We’ll all become stories that was on view from April 28 to September 16, 2018.

Image: Dr. O.J. Firestone in his living room, former Firestone family home, May 1979.​


Watch the interview series Storylines


Take a look back at these in-depth interviews with local artists produced for OAG's inaugural exhibition Àdisòkàmagan / Nous connaître un peu nous-mêmes / We’ll all become stories (April 28 to September 16, 2018). The series features Jennifer Dickson, whose exhibition The Credo Project opened this past February at OAG.


Superhero Plant Trading Cards


OAG wants to be a part of your homeschooling experience! This 6 minute video will walk you through the steps of an activity called Superhero Plant Trading Cards, developed by Ottawa-based artist Jaime Koebel (Métis, Cree).

Additional resources from our book Contemporary Indigenous Arts in the Classroom can be found below.
Please share your creations with us on social media! #OAGfromhome

PDF version of Contemporary Indigenous Arts in the Classroom

Lesson plans by grade